7 Warning Signs of Leaky Gut

Your gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which includes your gut, serves a pretty important role in your body. It’s central to your overall well-being, including physical and mental health. If your gut isn’t functioning properly, your body will have trouble absorbing all of the vital vitamins and minerals that you need. 

Today, one of the most common issues affecting people’s gut is something known as “Leaky Gut Syndrome.” Leaky Gut leads to a host of issues that will leave you feeling tired, emotional and more! Are you managing Leaky Gut? Here’s a list of 7 warning signs to watch our for… 

What is Leaky Gut Syndrome?

As the name implies, Leaky Gut Syndrome occurs when the lining of the wall of your small intestine is damaged. When this lining is damaged, your body will have difficulties absorbing nutrients and filtering out toxins and other waste.

By combining a lack of vital nutrients  and unknown toxin entering your bloodstream, you are setting yourself up for some problems. Your immune system will go into overdrive and lead to a variety of issues. However, your immune system is quickly weakened due to the lack of vital nutrients available, uh oh… With a compromised immune system,  you will begin to experience several undesirable health issues.

What Causes Leaky Gut? 

Two of the biggest contributors to Leaky Gut Syndrome are diet and stress. Ranging from an unhealthy diet to certain allergies and intolerances, what you decide to eat could be causing your issues. On the other hand, unhealthy stress levels can also be responsible for what’s going on with your body.

Gluten, soy, dairy or other intolerances affect the way your body interacts with these foods. Instead of digesting them as with any other food, someone with one of these intolerances will be unable to properly handle them. Even worse, your immune system acts like something is wrong and begins to attack these nutrients. When this occurs the lining of your small intestine is often damaged, leading to Leaky Gut Syndrome. Gluten is actually the number one cause of Leaky Gut Syndrome.

Stress is another contributor to the manifestation of Leaky Gut. You may already know this but your gut and your brain are actually connected! Your brain is able to directly affect what takes place in your stomach. A great example is the fact that your body starts producing juices necessary for digestion at even the thought of food. Crazy, right?

Chronic stress can affect your gut by causing worse inflammatory responses and making you even more prone to infection. Adding to this already delightful list, stress also lowers your pain tolerance, meaning the pain you experience will feel more intense than usual.

If your managing stress, you should try out some of these 11 Foods Proven to Boost Your Mood and get rid of some of that stress!

7 Warning Signs of Leaky Gut

1. Weakened immune system

2. Digestive issues (bloating, diarrhea, constipation)

3. Hormonal imbalances characterized by mixed or uncontrollable emotions

4. Chronic fatigue

5. Joint pain

6. Mood disorders (ADD, ADHD, depression, anxiety)

7. Skin conditions (acne, eczema, rosacea)

It’s important to be aware of the signs of leaky gut because it’s becoming increasingly common, yet many medical doctors are hesitant to even bring up the thought of leaky gut. Even when your health care provider fails to pick up the clues, you may be able to pick up on these warning signs.

Stay tuned for next week’s article on how to heal leaky gut with subtle lifestyle and dietary changes! Make sure to subscribe so you don’t miss it!

 

Related: Gut Bacteria: The Key To Weight Loss

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